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Phil Green

Phil Green

author, misLeading Indicators: How to Reliably Measure Your Business

Canada | Professional Services - Business Consulting

Can you make sense of on-line media metrics?

Posted over 10 years ago, 0 comments
On-line advertizing has grown immensely over the last few years. One estimate pegged growth from $55 million in 1995 to $54 billion in 2009, an annual growth rate of 63%. It’s not surprising then that there is some interest in trying to measure on-line advertizing.
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Investing in measurement usually pays off

Posted over 10 years ago, 0 comments
A headline in British journal “The Engineer” caught my eye a few weeks ago. It said that the British government has announced a £240 million (US $393 million) investment in measurement, with the aim of improving measurement techniques and technology to stimulate innovation in productions, processes and services.
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The definitions of performance indicators are critical: the case of unemployment.

Posted over 10 years ago, 0 comments
The US Bureau of Labor statistics calculates inflation several different ways. The mostly widely reported is U-3, and what people generally call the “unemployment rate.” U-6 has a broader definition and includes discouraged workers and those that work part time because they cannot find full time work.
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Sometimes polls mislead, but that’s life.

Posted over 10 years ago, 0 comments
Opinion polling is used in business for market research. Can businesses rely on such polling numbers? Or do they mislead? The answer is yes to both quesstions. To understand why, it is important to understand what the word “error” means, and the difference between sampling error and inferential error.
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Will anybody ever trust inflation measurements?

Posted over 10 years ago, 0 comments
About 200 years ago Joseph Lowe said that “the interest of government, the greatest of all debtors, [is] to prevent the public from fixing its attention on the gradual depreciation of money.”  It seems like the Argentinian government is doing its best to prove Lowe right. Recent reports (see here and here) suggest the Argentinian government is fiddling its inflation numbers. The  official number is 10%, private economists peg it closer to 25%.
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